Home > Uncategorized > California bill aimed at deterring large employers from placing low wage workers on part time status to avoid ACA coverage mandate

California bill aimed at deterring large employers from placing low wage workers on part time status to avoid ACA coverage mandate

California employers with 500 or more workers would be required to pay the state a penalty based on the average cost of coverage provided by large employers for those employees that enroll in Medicaid (Medi-Cal in California) coverage under advancing legislation.

According to an analysis of AB 880 prepared by the Assembly Health Committee, the bill is aimed at deterring large employers with sizable numbers of low wage workers from reducing their hours to less than 30 hours per week in order to avoid the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requirement to offer coverage to all workers employed at least 30 hours per week. “The author states this bill is designed to ensure that the largest employers in the state do not evade their responsibilities under the ACA by cutting hours and eliminating benefits so that their employees qualify for Medi-Cal,” the analysis states.  “This shifts costs onto the public and threatens the fiscal solvency of the state.”

As AB 880 moves forward, legislation stating intent to expand California’s Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act to households earning up to 133 percent of federal poverty level has bogged down over the extent to which counties should share in the cost and the Brown administration’s concern over the long term fiscal impact of the expansion and specifically whether California will remain obligated to honor it if federal cost share funding is cut in the future. Anxiety over Medicaid remains high among the state’s budget writers.  They viewed the state’s Medicaid cost share as a budget buster during years of fiscal shortfalls following the economic downturn that began in 2008.

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